What is a CMA (Comparable Market Analysis)?

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Before putting a home on the market or listing with a local real estate agent, home sellers obtain a comparative market analysis, also referred to in the industry as a CMA. Sellers use a CMA to figure out the value of their home and what to price their home for sale.

What is a Comparative Market Analysis?

Although reports can vary, from a two-page list of comparable home sales to a 50-page comprehensive guide, the length and complexity of the report depend on the agent’s business practice.

However, standard comparative market analysis reports contain the following data:

  • Active Listings

Active listings are homes currently for sale. These listings matter only to the extent that they are your competition for buyers. They are not indicative of market value because sellers can ask whatever they want for their home. It doesn’t mean any of the prices are realistic. The offered sales prices do not reflect market value until they sell, and in buyers market, for example, most sell for a lot less.

  • Pending Listings

Pending sale homes are formerly active listings that are under contract. They have not yet closed, so they are not yet a comparable sale. Unless the listing agent is willing to share information about the pending sale – and many are not – you will not know the actual sold price until the transaction closes. However, pending sales do indicate the direction the market is moving. If your home is priced above the list price of these pending sales, you could face longer DOM (Day On Market).

  • Sold Listings

Homes that have closed within the past six months are your comparable sales. These are the sales an appraiser will use when appraising your home for the buyer, along with the pending sales (which will likely have closed by the time your home is sold). Look long and hard at the comparable sales because those are your market value.

  • Off-Market / Withdrawn / Canceled

These are properties that were taken off the market for a variety of reasons. Usually, the reason homes are removed from the market is because the prices were too high. The median prices of this group will almost always be higher than the median prices of comparable sales. However,listings cancel, also for the following reasons:

1. Seller’s remorse. The sellers decided they cannot part with their home and no longer want to sell.

2. Priced too high. Nobody made an offer or the only offers received were low-ball offers, which were rejected.

3. The DOM were too long. Agents sometimes withdraw listings so they can put them back as a new listing and fool buyers.

4. Repair requests. The homes were once under contract and after the home inspection, the buyer requested repairs which the seller refused.

5. Seller fired the agent. It’s not uncommon for unhappy sellers to fire an agent and hire a newagent.

  • Expired Listings

This group will reflect the highest median sales price because they did not sell and were probably unreasonably priced. Some of the expired listings could also show up as an active listing, listed by a new agent at a new price. Listings also expire because they were not aggressively marketed or because the home was in need of repairs.

Examining Comparable Sales

Comparable sales are those that most closely resemble your home. It is difficult to compare a tri-level home to a single-story home. Select the homes from this list that are mostly identical to your home in size, shape and condition, such as:

  • Similar Square Footage

Appraisers compare homes based on square footage. Larger square-foot homes are worth less per square foot than smaller square-foot homes. The variance among a group of median-priced homes ideally should not exceed more than 200 to 400 square feet, plus or minus.

  • Similar Age of Construction

Ideally, the age of the home – the year it was built – should be within a few years of other comparable sold homes. Mixed-age subdivisions are common. For example, in one area of Sacramento, a subdivision consists of homes built in the 1950s, and then they jump a couple decades to the 1970s. Although the homes are located next door to each other, the homes loaded with character from the 1950s sell for more than their newer Brady Bunch counterparts. If your home was built in 1980, say, and brand new homes up the street are selling for more, you cannot command the same price as a new home.

  • Similar Amenities, Upgrades, and Condition

Appraisers will deduct value from your home if other homes have upgrades and yours does not. A home with a swimming pool will have a different value than a home without a pool. A completely remodeled home is worth more than a fixer. Homes with one bath are worth less than homes with two or more baths. Deferred maintenance will count against you.

  • Location

Everybody knows that real estate is valued on “location, location, location,” but have you considered what that means? A home with a view of the city, for example, is worth more than a home facing a cement wall. Homes located on busy thoroughfares are worth considerably less than homes on quiet streets. Compare your home to those in similar locations. If your home sits across the street from a power plant, look for other homes with power plant exposure or those located along railroad tracks, among other undesirable locations.

For a FREE CMA of your property visit: www.ModernoRealtyHomeValue.com

Source: The Balance

 

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Getting top dollar for your home

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If you’re thinking of selling your property, here are the places in every home you should be paying attention to.

With the prime summer selling season coming, you may be wondering which areas of my property can give me the best return on my investment if i decide to renovate.

Here are the five key renovation strategies that are time-tested, require minimal effort and provide options for every budget. These improvements are designed to get you the best bang for your buck and top dollar for your property when you sell it.

1. Flooring

Every single person in a household will touch the floor every day in varying degrees, whether it’s the bedroom, living room or kitchen. It comes as no surprise that upgrading the flooring is a key feature that will go a long way to capture a buyer’s attention.

Here are some key tips:

  • Remove outdated carpets (or at the very least, if that is not possible, ensure the carpets are professionally steam cleaned, looking fresh with no stains, rips or tears).
  • Replace old carpets with either laminate flooring, hardwood flooring or ceramic tiles.
  • It’s been proven buyers view non-carpeted flooring more positively, as it’s easier to clean and helps with family members who have allergies.

2. Fixtures and hardware

These may seem small on the surface, but can make quite a difference. Fixtures and hardware include items such as door knobs, handles on doors and closets, entrances and exits, cabinet hardware, bathroom and lighting fixtures, etc.

They are easy to replace, fairly inexpensive, come in many color and design options, and provide great options for anyone on a budget. The best part is that the seller gets a great return on investment for not a lot of money. These are simple and cheap, but definitely a worthwhile improvement to any home.

On the other hand, if fixtures and hardware have not been replaced, it can really date a property and make it appear as if it has not been maintained.

Just remember, everyone has to either touch a door or walk through it!

3. Bathrooms

Without a doubt, any money you spend on upgrading a bathroom will be worth the effort, as it’s considered the second-most-important room in the house.

Key upgrades include:

  • New tile and grout (floors and shower)
  • New faucet and hardware
  • New coat of paint on walls or cabinets
  • Upgrading or replacing cabinets (this can including swiping out new
  • hardware and sanding down old cabinets and repainting them or replacing them completely)

4. Kitchen

This is the most valuable room in the house – if homeowners only have one place where they can opt to do renovations, the kitchen is a sure-fire bet to pay off.

You don’t need to spend a fortune in order to make it look spectacular.

Here are some simple add-ons or improvements:

  • Add in a new deluxe faucet
  • Change out cabinet door hardware with new handles or knobs
  • Upgrade or purchase new appliances (fridge, range and hood, dishwasher, etc.) with a clean look that complements each piece, giving the kitchen a cohesive design
  • Add new lighting
  • Create a backsplash to help jazz up appearance and functionality
  • Rebuild standard cabinetry at half the price (as opposed to custom cabinets or using expensive materials)

5. Add an income-suite

Depending on the city or municipality, if the neighborhood allows for income suites, sellers could potentially add 150 percent to 160 percent of equity into their home by putting in an extra suite.

This allows you the owner to also potentially receive additional income through a tenant that can help pay off the mortgage or as an additional investment. Depending on the specific market or city, demand for double unit homes can rise by more than 25 percent.

Research the market area of the home – if the city is growing, it means more people will move into that city. Also, check if the government and other institutions are planning on investing into that market; for example, are they planning to build hospitals, schools, universities, new transit system, etc.? This may signal that as the community grows, there will be a greater demand for housing, tenant opportunities and increased equity for homes who can support the upsurge.

If you have any questions please contact us, we look forward to talking with you.

Source: Pillar to Post Inspectors